Why did the U.S. Navy drop nuclear weapons in Hiroshima?

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In 1945, the U,S.

and Japan agreed to surrender to end World War II.

The United States was to surrender by the end of the year, while Japan would surrender by December 6.

The date was also chosen to coincide with the end to the Second World War.

The agreement was signed in a conference room at the Pentagon on March 6, 1945.

But the United States and Japan never actually signed the agreement, which was negotiated by then-Secretary of State Henry Stimson.

The Japanese were not pleased about the agreement because it included provisions that were not strictly enforceable.

Stimson was also concerned that a U.N. Security Council resolution against war crimes by the Japanese would lead to a UN vote against Japan.

So on March 7, 1945, Secretary of State George Marshall signed an agreement with Japanese Prime Minister Hideki Tojo.

This was the first time the two countries had agreed to a surrender, which the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) passed unanimously in 1946.

The U.K., France and Russia all signed an additional agreement, the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, on March 14, which contained similar provisions.

However, the United Kingdom and France, which signed on to the treaty, were unable to ratify it because of their anti-war stance.

France and Britain were reluctant to ratifying it because they feared it would be seen as an affront to the U

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Why did the U.S. Navy drop nuclear weapons in Hiroshima?

admin 0

In 1945, the U,S.

and Japan agreed to surrender to end World War II.

The United States was to surrender by the end of the year, while Japan would surrender by December 6.

The date was also chosen to coincide with the end to the Second World War.

The agreement was signed in a conference room at the Pentagon on March 6, 1945.

But the United States and Japan never actually signed the agreement, which was negotiated by then-Secretary of State Henry Stimson.

The Japanese were not pleased about the agreement because it included provisions that were not strictly enforceable.

Stimson was also concerned that a U.N. Security Council resolution against war crimes by the Japanese would lead to a UN vote against Japan.

So on March 7, 1945, Secretary of State George Marshall signed an agreement with Japanese Prime Minister Hideki Tojo.

This was the first time the two countries had agreed to a surrender, which the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) passed unanimously in 1946.

The U.K., France and Russia all signed an additional agreement, the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, on March 14, which contained similar provisions.

However, the United Kingdom and France, which signed on to the treaty, were unable to ratify it because of their anti-war stance.

France and Britain were reluctant to ratifying it because they feared it would be seen as an affront to the U

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